The Sklar Brothers’ “What Are We Talking About?”

comedy

Is there anything more beautiful than witnessing a performance where everything just clicks? Whether it’s watching your favorite pitcher throw a no-hitter, your favorite dancer nail every trick in their routine, or standing there slack-jawed as your buddy bowls a perfect 300, you can’t help but walk away with a sensation of “Wow.” And in most cases, it’s not just that they’re really good at what they do…they also make it look effortless. Of course, the easier they make it look to perform such feats is proof of the perfect storm of natural talent and hours they’ve spent working on their craft. 
Add to the list above Jason and Randy Sklar, AKA The Sklar Brothers, and their new album, “What Are We Talking About?” It’s no coincidence this project, complete with pre, post, and halftime shows from your favorite commentators, is sports-themed as the guys pull off a performance just as sweet as any you’ve seen in the Sweet Science. Their teamwork is flawless – I suspect it’s due to being twins and the supernatural telekinetic powers they possess as a result – and their timing is impeccable as their words overlap just enough to keep your brain engaged, forcing it to keep up with their rat-a-tat speed without it being overloaded.
Having another person to work off of onstage gives them a bit of an advantage when it comes to re-living conversations (like the most depressing chat with Lightning McQueen you’ll ever hear) and pulling off some pretty ingenious impressions (their comparison of Google to a guy at a party with inappropriate additions to a conversation is a great premise and their dueling Allen Iverson is eerily accurate).
Unlike most comedy duos, whose bits are comprised primarily of interacting with each other in various situations or straight guy/ridiculous guy scenarios, the Sklars instead work as a two-headed singular point of view coming at you in living stereo. Their rapid fire back-and-forth is an impressive display of timing and the occasional punchlines spoken in unison serve as audible forms of bold and italics (A great example of this is when they point out the Christmas song that begins with a threat: YOU BETTER WATCH OUT)
You could have the most impressive delivery in the world – and these guys definitely have that – but without the material to go along with it, you can only last so far on presentation alone. Fortunately the Sklars aren’t lacking on that front as they serve up the best place to build the Mullet Hall of Fame, absolutely kill it with an impression of Stephen A Smith, explain how Richard Simmons is bad for your wifi connection, and re-write jokes they wrote with children.
The title of the CD asks the question “What Are We Talking About?” and the Sklars provide an answer by talking about everything. From anthropomorphized products that shouldn’t have a Brooklyn accent to the comparison of Lance Armstrong’s life before and after the doping scandal to the best – and most accurate – Pepsi commercial ever, it’s not just whatthe Sklars are talking about that makes this album so fun, but how  they talk about it. Looks like it’s gonna be another good season for Team Sklar.

Joe DeRosa’s “You Let Me Down”

By virtue of writing this review, I’m veering perilously close to the cesspool of people whom Joe DeRosa warns us to avoid on his new project, You Let Me DownTo be honest, I can’t say he’d be wrong. The Internet really is chock-full of people who think the rest of the world needs to be informed of their every thought and opinion simply because they have access to a keyboard and free coffee-shop wifi. 
I’ve always been careful to stress that my opinions here at Comedy Reviews are exactly that: opinions. You may very well disagree with my point of view, my style of writing, or the font I’ve lazily chosen, and that’s totally allowed. At the end of the day, I’m just a dork who enjoys listening to – and writing about – stand-up comedy with very little actual stand-up experience that would qualify me to do so. 
I say all of that to say this: I really liked You Let Me Down. It made me laugh. A lot.
And now, as is the duty of every self-proclaimed online reviewer, I shall expound despite the fact no one asked me to.
I’ve been a fan of DeRosa’s for some time now (long-time readers of the site may recall my very first review was his The Depression Auction CD), and despite the title of this newest outing he has yet to let me down. There are few people who can wring so much funny out of so much disgruntledness. As DeRosa gets more and more wound up (Why can’t we just go back to punching each other in the face? Why do we insist on open-casket funerals? And seriously, Arizona… what the hell is wrong with you?), the humor of his rants escalates proportionally. 

Unlike many comics shining the light of WTF on people and situations around them, DeRosa isn’t doing so from a position of superiority. He’s transparent about his battle with anxiety and the one-on-one confrontations he and Prozac have battled out. That being said, there’s a lot out there begging to be dealt with and taken down a peg or two and Joe is just the guy for the job. 

DeRosa has no patience for Olympic athletes and even less understanding of the confusion that sets in when they inevitably act up. Of course Ryan Lochte did what he did; he’s an athlete and… well… athletes are assholes. Where’s the mystery?

It’s golden geese like these whose necks DeRosa so gleefully throttles on this album, and to be completely honest, it’s a great thing to witness. He doesn’t shy away from being what may be perceived as politically incorrect and, of course, therein lies the comedy. He refuses to play it safe and as a result we get some great bits on gender equality (Are we fistfighting or not?), dating apps (There’s a fine line between psychopaths, sociopaths, and serial killers), and porn (It’s a shame that when it comes to entering the industry the door is no longer exit-only).

Despite what appears to be a dismal outlook on society, his seemingly constant state of dissatisfaction, or his general mode of being annoyed, one can’t help but see through the entire facade. You just get the sense that buried deep down beneath the exasperation beats the heart of a genuinely good guy – or at least the heart of someone doing his best to be good. 

But then… another celebrity gets a free pass just because they’re a celebrity and another douche golfer throws a hissy fit and another homicide cop gives an interview that makes him sound crazier than the maniac he’s hunting and… well… 

Seriously, can we just start punching people in the face again?

Daniel Tosh’s “People Pleaser”

In light of recent events across the world dealing with comedians being prosecuted and persecuted for the jokes they tell, I’m glad we have comedians like Daniel Tosh. We need to be shocked. We need to laugh at what shocked us. And then we need to be shocked again. 
If you’re familiar with Tosh and his comedy then you know that’s his strong suit and with his new CD, “People Pleaser,” he doesn’t disappoint. I’d like to share some of his one-liners here, but to be honest, I don’t know how well it would translate. It’s not solely what he says, but also they way it’s delivered. With his trademark cocky persona and who-gives-a-crap attitude, he’s the perfect comedy caricature. Tosh the comedian belongs in the same category as Archie Bunker or Don Rickles. We don’t laugh because we agree with what they’re saying, but because what they’re saying is so incredibly outrageous and should never be said aloud. 
Sometimes that approach gets Tosh into trouble, as he briefly touches upon when he mentions a recent joke that blew up social media and offended people who don’t completely understand how an on-screen persona works. Of course, he responds exactly how you’d think he would respond, by pouring grease on the fire and then throwing the fire at his loved ones.
Considering the current state of the nation, perhaps Tosh is exactly the comedian we need. We’ve been coddled and waited on long enough. It’s about time someone gave us some much-needed straight talk. He’s talking to you, “America’s Number One”-ers, half-marathon runners, hoarders, female Crossfitters, and people who have ever uttered the sentence, “There’s nothing funny about _________.”
We’ve become such a reactionary society, so eager to post on Facebook yet another story about how someone dared offend us, Tosh is a breath of fresh air amid the pollution of “you hurt my feels!” that I’ve been choking on as of late. 

No one is safe. Not kids with terminal illnesses, not the Dyson company (I wish I could see the looks on their faces when they hear their “product placement”), not cafe artists with no idea of how to price their work, and certainly not the city of Cleveland.
Tosh isn’t for everyone and he’d be the first to tell you that (he warns the crowd on more than one occasion that it’s about to get worse. A lot worse) and that’s totally fine. If you’re not a fan of Tosh or his comedy, then you’ll actually enjoy his bit on the time he lost a road rage battle. There are few things that are as glorious as seeing someone you can’t stand get a face full of chewed-up Doritos. But, if you’re like me and enjoy his comedy, then you’ll also enjoy the story of the time he won a road rage battle. 
“People Pleaser” may not please all of the people all of the time, but let’s be honest, it’s not supposed to. And it’s no fun if someone doesn’t get angry.

Keith Alberstadt’s “Walk It Off”

Spring has sprung and with it comes the emergence of warmer weather, driving with your windows rolled down, and longer daylight hours. Perhaps the most welcome arrival, though, is “Walk It Off,” the outstanding new release from Keith Alberstadt that hasn’t left my playlist since the day it came out. 
With friendly sarcasm accentuated by his punchy delivery, this project has been the perfect way to quench what has been a relatively dry comedy spell for me. When I use the phrase “friendly sarcasm,” it’s exactly what I mean. It can be hard to be sarcastic without coming off as angry, condescending, or jagoff-y. Alberstadt pulls off what most comics can’t: making snarky-yet-truthful comments that are laugh-out-loud funny without resorting to mean-spirited take-no-prisoners comedy. There are no victims here…Except for the fish keeping its eye on the food container. Or people who drink green tea. Or Alberstadt’s dad (but only while answering his smart phone)

Reading the track listing is an exercise in “Ah yeah, that was a good one, too” and I’m smirking now recalling the toddler who has trouble with the letter “R,” the vegan-intruder pillow barricade, white noise birds, and the parenting style in the 80s that inspired the title of the CD. As I’m sitting here smiling to myself, I’m wondering if it’s not unlike Alberstadt’s own creepy smile he didn’t even know he had.
I usually allow a few minutes at the beginning of a comedian’s set to allow him (or her) to settle in, get a feel for the crowd, and find their groove. That’s never been the case with Alberstadt. He’s good to go from the get-go. He’s comfortable on stage and from the second he begins there’s no doubt that he’s got this. It’s pretty impressive how quickly he puts the crowd at ease and there’s not even a moment of “gimme a second” trepidation.
What I’m trying to say – as if you couldn’t already tell – is I really enjoyed this album and the third time listening was just as enjoyable as the first. Usually when I write a review for this blog I listen, listen again, listen yet again, write, and then archive it. That won’t be the case this time around. This is comedy you’ll want to hang on to for a while. 

Or at least until something scares away the white noise birds. After that…you’re on your own.

Tony Sam’s “Scaredy Cat”

When it comes to comedy, there’s no right or wrong approach. Some, like Carlin, have become renowned for their ingenious wordplay. Others, like Seinfeld and Gaffigan, have perfected the art of observation. Then there are comedians like C.K. and Brody whose craft is rooted strongly in a brilliantly-crafted story. 
And then you have Tony Sam, whose latest album “Scaredy Cat” wonderfully displays that he has decided to embrace the simple tactic of…just having a good time.
It works. 
That’s not to say that Sam isn’t a great storyteller (he is, as is displayed by the epic retelling of the time he was arrested for drunk driving – not in a car – and how he decided to make the most of the adventure) and if you doubt his observational skills, then I present as evidence his riffs on men with beardy beards and the real reason homeless people don’t want your restaurant leftovers.
Sam gleefully adds a touch of fun and whimsy to each of his bits, all of them accentuated by his distinct vocal tone and cadence. His voice reminded me of Will Forte cranked to 11 but Sam put it better when he described it as the love-child voice-baby of Homer Simpson and Kermit the Frog. 
Needless to say, his voice hasn’t exactly helped his cause when it comes to suave seduction (and Sam has a few hilarious war stories to offer as proof). When it comes to comedy, however, it’s a blessing in disguise. “La Voz” serves to heighten his often-manic tales of pregnancy scares (or, as women probably refer to them, “near miracles”), giant bee attacks (wait…what exactly are you saying?), and his impression of his mother. 
If you haven’t figured it out by now, Sam (or “T-Bone,” as he likes to refer to himself) has a more-than-slightly skewed outlook on life which is probably why he’s doing much better at stand-up than he did when he was working at a fancy cake shop (a bakery so fancy, I wouldn’t be surprised if it was a cake shoppe). Only when you’re dealing with the general public do you have to put up with complaints about cakes personalized for robots (oops) or children crying about too much fudge (Really? Who complains about too much fudge?)
The title of this project is fitting, as Sam shares with us a number of things that frighten him. It’s not strange that he suffers from arachnophobia but what does set him apart is how it affects his Spider-Man viewing habits (he doesn’t watch) and his thoughts on a better plot for the webslinger (just a guy with a bag of spiders, throwing them at people). Other things that give him the jitters include today’s modern day in-your-face gum commercials and the Gorton’s Fisherman who, apparently, also dabbles in chemistry.
Scaredy Cat” is a fun CD that I enjoyed from beginning to end each time I listened.  You’re sure to have a good time as well, unless perhaps you’re seated in the front row with your arms crossed. In that case, just….just stop it.

Matt Braunger’s “Big Dumb Animal”

When it comes to writing reviews for this website, I’ve developed a method that I believe works well and gives each project a pretty fair shot. I listen to the CD twice all the way through before writing a single word. Then I write down the track listing and as I play through for a third time I begin to make notes. This has become a self-imposed rule that I’ve stuck to on all but a handful of the nearly 300 reviews I’ve thrown up here. Sometimes I jot down quotes and sometimes just the premise for bits that grabbed my attention. I write down what stood out as really good and I write down what stood out as really bad. If a track goes by that isn’t particularly noteworthy, I simply delete that line and move on to the next. By the end of the final playback, I have a skeleton of a review from which to work.
After reviewing – and really enjoying – Matt Braunger’s “Shovel Fighter” back in July of 2012, I was looking forward to his follow-up project, “Big Dumb Animal.” After my first time around, though, I was a bit disappointed. Nothing jumped out at me and I was hard-pressed to recall and specific bits. I remembered that he yelled a lot but…that was about it. 
I wanted to like this CD and was hopeful that on my second listen things would click. There were a few occasions of “Oh yeah, this one was good” but for the most part I found myself apathetic and I couldn’t put my finger on why. Braunger was certainly putting his all into it and he sure was yelling a lot but it all felt to be much ado about nothing.
As I approached my third listen, I told myself that this would be the time everything fell into place. I made a list of the 18 track titles and ended up taking notes on less than half of them (only seven, to be exact) and finally had to be honest and admit to myself that I just didn’t connect with this one. I didn’t love it and I didn’t hate it and perhaps therein lies the problem: “Big Dumb Animal” didn’t make me feel anything.
Braunger’s bits on blood donor questionnaires and the guy on the bus who didn’t know when to not hit on a woman were entertaining but there seemed to be more misses than hits this time around. He takes the long, long, long, looong way around to get to a “Please drink responsibly” punchline and I found his description of a waiter spilling a tray of food so unbelievably slapstick-y, it was like it happened in an episode of “Saved By the Bell.” 
What really stands out to me, though, is the fact that 11 tracks went by and garnered no reaction at all. That’s a big percentage and a fact I can’t ignore. As a lifelong fan of the Chicago Cubs, I know a bad batting average when I see one. But, as a lifelong fan of the Chicago Cubs, I don’t give up on my team just because they had a bad game. “Big Dumb Animal” wasn’t what I hoped it would be, but I’m still optimistic. We’ll get ‘em next time, guys.

Maronzio Vance’s “Laughmatic”

knew I liked Maronzio Vance. 
Maybe it’s because he was a cast member of one of my favorite canceled-too-soon television shows of recent history. Maybe it’s because he comes highly recommended by a friend whose opinion I highly respect. Or maybe – just maybe – it’s because he’s so freakin’ funny (or, as I used to say growing up in Indiana, “so stinkin’ funny”)
I’ll go with the latter. I admit I didn’t put two and two together and didn’t even realize Vance was an “Enlisted” cast member until I peeked at his website. It was a great show but unfortunately not around long enough for me to become familiar with the names of the cast members (I’m still bitter about this show slipping through the cracks knowing “Two and a Half Men” is still on the air).
I like to think I’m not so influential that I automatically like everything my friend recommends based on the sole fact it was his recommendation. We have a healthy “agree to disagree” relationship when it comes to comedy we don’t see eye-to-eye on. We can disagree and discuss without it hampering our friendship. Weird, I know.
Which leaves the final option: Vance is indeed one funny guy. 
You don’t have to listen to “Laughmatic” long before that fact makes itself apparent. Vance is laid-back and comfortable onstage and his comedy is smooth and relatable. Vance is one of us: a regular Joe who just happens to pick up on the messed-up stupid quirks of daily life. One wouldn’t think that a matter of four cents would be something about which a scene would be caused but sometimes it’s the principal of the matter and you have to stand up to the Little Caesar and fight for your rights.
Vance knows what it is to feel the bite of our current economy and when he learns that clean shoes are just as good as new shoes, it’s a game changer. He struggles with the depression that comes with residing in a studio apartment (you’re only one room away from being homeless) and he would gladly eat healthier if you didn’t have to take out a home loan in order to do so.
I really like the way Vance handles the touchy subject of race (yes, I stole that phrase from “Avenue Q”). His commentary is biting and honest but never comes across as preachy or angry. Whether he’s accidentally being racist while giving a threat level-themed compliment, having his handouts refused by a prejudiced vagrant, or explaining to a child why white people hate black people, Vance creates an environment where everyone feels free to laugh.
That’s not to say Vance has never ruffled any feathers. Just ask the girl working at the cell phone cover kiosk in the mall. Or the man on the street who is particularly stingy with his dollar dances. Or anyone who thinks the bald eagle should be the American mascot forever and ever, despite the fact that bald eagles – the symbol of freedom – are almost extinct. Cockroaches, on the other hand, will be around forever. Just sayin’.
The CD is bookended with a behind-the-scenes pre and post-show interview with Rooftop Records’s Dominic Del Bene. It’s fun to listen to Vance give his thoughts on the performance, reviewing himself in a much funnier and more entertaining way than I can. “Is it great?” he muses. “I don’t know.”

It is, Maronzio. It is.

Dylan Brody’s “Dylan Goes Electric: Live at the Throckmorton”

Back in 1984 I was a 13-year-old sitting in an Indiana Junior High classroom getting the “Don’t Do Drugs” talk from a representative from the local police force. Although I agreed with the basic gist of his speech (What can I say, I was a good boy), there was something that didn’t quite sit right with me; Something about his spiel just didn’t make sense. I couldn’t put my finger on it but, like watching any effects-heavy retouched George Lucas film, you can tell that something didn’t line up. 
No, I hadn’t heard about that kid who was speeding down the back roads at an ungodly rate, tripping out on MARIJUANA, but why would a policeman lie? It seemed logical that he saw a deer (every Indiana story has a deer) and yes, I had heard of the hallucinogenic effects MARIJUANA has on a person (this was back in the day when MARIJUANA was the worst drug my little town had seen. Fast forward to 2014 when Garrett IN has twice as many meth labs as it does stoplights), and it only made sense that he saw the deer morph into a dragon and it scared him so badly he veered off the road, hit a tree, and he died instantly.
If only Dylan Brody had been there to play Sherlock Holmes to my John Watson. He would have pointed out to me that no one could have known what someone else was seeing before they died instantly. I had completely forgotten about that cautionary tale until I listened to Brody’s new project, “Dylan Goes Electric: Live at the Throckmorton” and he re-counted a similar tale told to him as a youngster (without the deer and with marijuana swapped out for a much more appropriate drug of choice).
Brody is back with another collection of stories that are just as wonderfully and meticulously crafted as any he’s told in the past (readers of this blog already know I’m a Dylan Brody Fanboy), and it’s nice to re-visit a dear friend. He begins this CD with a few stories about his mother that will connect with anyone who’s tried to walk an older relative through the workings of [insert any technological item that’s been invented since the year 2000 here]. 
As you hear Brody’s patience get stretched to its limit while Mrs Brody struggles with understanding her GPS, the earth’s rotation, and the music of The Mountain Goats, you can’t help but empathize with his clenched teeth and the sarcastic asides that he must – he must – say out loud so as not to fly off the handle. That’s what I love about Brody. He never yells at someone even if they might have it coming (like his ridiculous mugger-turned-panhandler), but exacts his own revenge by taking the higher road, happily hovering over them, leaving them standing in a cloud of misunderstanding while he and his father snicker at wordplay on “ad hominem.”
You think we’re here for standup comedy, but really Brody is here to tell a poem (it just has a 55-minute intro). When we finally get to his poetry you’ll find it was more than worth the wait. His Seuss-ian Sudoku piece will make both your mouth and ears smile even though it’s sure to ruffle the feathers of Star Wars nerds everywhere (Say it with me: “ANAKIN!!!”)
If/when you do purchase this album, I encourage you to take the time to browse the liner notes. Not only will you enjoy some of Brody’s own artwork but his written commentary adds a nice touch of flair to each piece. In a time when CD art has become a lost skill, it’s nice to see it hasn’t been forgotten. That’s what you get when you’re dealing with a perfectionist like Brody. When he does something, not only does he do it well, he does all of it well.  Brody knocks it out of the park time after time after time and this go-around is no exception. Plug in “Electric” and see for yourself.

Joe DeRosa’s “Mistakes Were Made: The B-Sides”

Last night I was talking with Nick, a friend and fellow comedy enthusiast, and as usually happens when we get together and talk about our favorite comedians, the subject eventually came around to Joe DeRosa. Nick wondered if DeRosa had anything new out and I was happy to report that yes, as a matter of fact, “Mistakes Were Made: The B Sides” had just recently become available. “How is it?” he and I was able to sum up my thoughts in five words: 
“It’s Joe DeRosa. It’s funny.”
Nick understood immediately. It’s DeRosa. Of course it’s a funny CD (or, in this case, double CD). This project is a compilation of new material and bits that never made the final cut on his previous albums. When patched together like a stand-up version of Frankenstein’s monster, it makes for an impressive final product that comedy fans are sure to enjoy. At times it’s a bit jarring as we jump from one club to the next – the various quality of production levels are quite blatant – but after a few seconds your ears assimilate to the audio juxtapositions and it’s back to business.
If you’re familiar with DeRosa’s comedy, then you already have an idea of what to expect: a guy dealing with life’s frustrations in an exceptionally funny way. He laments the pricey process of trying to catch a movie in New York City, confesses his jealousy of three fat guys walking through the mall armed with unicorns and a cake, and reveals the no-longer-secret tests Daters Of DeRosa must pass.
You could call DeRosa an observational comic but one who specifically observes people. He doesn’t bother with bits about inanimate objects (OK, there’s one brief exception with a subway car) but instead finds himself fascinated with his encounters with fellow citizens. He’s a people-watcher extraordinaire and no one he bumps into is safe from being included in his material; Not the Guatemalan guy peeing in the hall, not the stripper who broke through the fourth wall, and not his favorite porn star hiding a little (or maybe not-so-little)secret. 
Just over a year ago, right after his previous CD was released, I was able to catch up with DeRosa after a show and we spoke briefly about what was next for him. He hinted at darker elements to come, of using his comedy to dig into deeper areas, and they’re here on this album. We are presented with the eight (no wait, make that seven) stages of life and DeRosa presents his theory that no matter which phase we find ourselves in, we’re never truly free. It’s a bleak outlook but not so bleak that DeRosa can’t find humor along the way. He delves into life and death and opens up about his fear about being wrong – and right – about what happens in the afterlife. Of course, DeRosa is able to tread these deeper waters and still make us laugh. Encouraging genuine introspection while simultaneously making people laugh is no small feat and DeRosa pulls it off effortlessly. 
This is my fourth time having the pleasure of reviewing an album by DeRosa and my fourth time raving about how much I enjoyed it. “Mistakes Were Made,” you say? Please. 
I wish I screwed up this successfully. 

Andy Kindler’s “I Wish I Was Bitter”

First thing’s first: The “new” release from Andy Kindler, “I Wish I Was Bitter” (Yes, he’s well aware that title isn’t grammatically correct, but he’s edgy like that) was originally recorded back in 2003 and has only just recently been made available to download for the first time. Aside from the occasional references to “Queer Eye for the Straight Guy” (Wow, I totally forgot about that show) and “Whoopi” (Yep. Forgot about that one, too), the disc holds up pretty well. Then again, bitterness never really goes out of fashion.
If you take a bucket of that bitterness, season it with a generous helping of jealousy, remove any inkling of self-confidence or bridge-burning self-awareness, coupled with a heaping spoonful of malice toward TV executives, then you’ve just got an angry guy who never made it as big as he thought he would. Or should. But you add in a witty sense of biting humor that holds no punches and keeps the audience on its toes, then my friend you have Andy Kindler.
Kindler never made it big as a comic (at least not as of this taping) and he has some strong words for those who did. Carrot Top, Margaret Cho, Lorne Michaels, Dennis Miller, the cast of The George Lopez Show, Wayne Brady, and Jim Belushi (Oh, that Jim Belushi) all find themselves in Kindler’s crosshairs. As he struggles to comprehend what these people have that he doesn’t, Kindler lashes out at them and doesn’t hold back. Poor Belushi finds himself getting the brunt of Kindler’s ire, especially when we try to break down his TV deal using the five Ws (and one H) of investigative journalism. You almost feel bad for the guy and maybe you would if you weren’t so busy laughing at Kindler’s exasperated furor.
People who live outside the entertainment world may find that this CD has a tendency to fly over their heads from time to time. Kindler jokes that he isn’t a comedian for a mainstream audience and he has a point. I don’t know how many people without a foot in the industry will connect with his jokes about pilot season and collecting residuals, but for those of us who’ve dabbled in – and around – the entertainment world (or maybe just watch shows like EpisodesLouie, or Maron), then there are a lot of wink-winks and nudge-nudges to enjoy here. 
When Kindler strays from his insider material, the laughs come just as strong. I loved his cell phone being set to “samba,” his impressions of the Frankenstein monster performing hacky comedy and morning zoo radio, and most of all his dissection of the old Supermantelevision show and the voiceover announcer who clearly wasn’t pleased with his career path. It’s a brilliant bit that Kindler may or may not be happy knowing would appeal to a wide audience.
One of the fun things about listening to an album in 2014 that was recorded in 2003 is having the gift of hindsight. It’s entertaining hearing Kindler rail on “Last Comic Standing” knowing that seven years later he would be on the show as a judge (but, in fairness, the show had morphed into a completely different concept by that time. Less reality show and more comedian-y). Yes, more than a few bits here are directed at industry movers and shakers, telling them why they should hire him (and also pointing out when they shouldn’t) but – as time eventually went on to prove – it worked. Kindler calls “Last Comic Standing” the worst thing that could ever possibly happen to comedians and seven years later, he’s a judge on the show. It’s a tactic I never would have thought of, but apparently it works. 
Hey, Spielberg. Guess what? You suck donkey.
Now all I have to do is wait until 2021 and I’ll be golden. Indiana Jones Part 6 here I come!